The Babysitter

October 14, 2017
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Director: McG

 

Starring:

Samara Weaving

Hana Mae Lee

Judah Lewis

 

Films can be based on true events or be about galaxies far, far away, there are no set rules.  The key to a good movie isn’t simply whether it is based on the girl next door or an alien invasion, but rather, to show the viewer what the rules are for their particular film.  It’s hard to say what are the limits as to what is considered fair game in any movie, at the end of the day films are art and art can be whatever it wants, but I will say that consistency is key.  If a movie sets out to make be a comedy, it should make you laugh, if it’s a horror movie, then it needs to scare you or creep you out, sometimes though a movie tries to be too many things and ends up not achieving much of anything, kind of like The Babysitter.

 

Cole (Judah Lewis) plays a stereotypical nerdy kid who can’t seem to catch a break.  He gets picked on in school, his parents treat him like a baby and he is constantly worrying about things he doesn’t need to worry about, such as how many teenagers die in car accidents every day.  The one saving grace for him is his friend and babysitter, Bee (Samara Weaving), who just seems to get him.  One night, when his parents are out of town, Cole sneaks out of this bedroom to see what Bee is up too, he sees her with a group of kids from what we assume is the local high school. Cole witnesses a game of spin the bottle turn to horror as Bee is revealed to be a psycho killer.  Now Cole must gather his wits and escape his assailants finally proving that he is more than just a kid.

My expression once the credits rolled.

 

If the synopsis of the movie sounds stupid and cheesy, it is because it is stupid and cheesy, albeit purposefully stupid and cheesy, at least I think so.  Although I think the plot is not to be taken seriously, the movie doesn’t make it outright clear that it is operating under a different set of guidelines. I watched it as a movie with a wacky plot, but even wacky needs some ground rules, the movie meanders from coming of age, to horror, to screwball comedy, I half expected the entire thing to a be dream sequence, that is how nonsensical the plot and story became.  But alas, it wasn’t a dream, it was a just shoddy script that tries to pass off all of its plot holes as jokes because the movie is so tongue and cheek (sarcasm). This is the kind of movie a super fan would defend by saying, “You just don’t get the Director.”  Which is true, I don’t get it, and I don’t want to get it, what I want is the hour and twenty-five minutes I spent watching this back, but we don’t get what we want sometimes.

 

Netflix continues to roll out its factory of in house movies, even though I think this particular film was a whiff they have generally produced good films.  Would I recommend this film?  Hell no.  However, usually if I don’t like a movie I still say what kind of movie it is, in the event that someone may still like it.  I may dislike a film, but recommend it to comedy buffs, since it is funny, or horror fans, because it’s scary.  But for this film, I don’t know who to direct towards it.  It doesn’t fit any mold, sometimes that is a good thing, but in this case the movie doesn’t do any particular genre justice, really the only people who might like it are people who like to have the TV on while they are doing their homework, aside from you studious individuals, I think everyone should skip this one.  On to the next one Netflix!

Director: McG Starring: Samara Weaving Hana Mae Lee Judah Lewis   Films can be based on true events or be about galaxies far, far away, there are no set rules.  The key to a good movie isn’t simply whether it is based on the girl next door or an alien invasion, but rather, to show the viewer what the rules are for their particular film.  It’s hard to say what are the limits as to what is considered fair game in any movie, at the end of the day films are art and art can be whatever it wants, but I will say that consistency is key.  If a movie sets out to make be a comedy, it should make you laugh, if it’s a horror movie, then it needs to scare you or creep you out, sometimes though a movie tries to be too many things and ends up not achieving much of anything, kind of like The Babysitter.   Cole (Judah Lewis) plays a stereotypical nerdy kid who can’t seem to catch a break.  He gets picked on in school, his parents treat him like a baby and he is constantly worrying about things he doesn’t need to worry about, such as how many teenagers die in car accidents every day.  The one saving grace for him is his friend and babysitter, Bee (Samara Weaving), who just seems to get him.  One night, when his parents are out of town, Cole sneaks out of this bedroom to see what Bee is up too, he sees her with a group of kids from what we assume is the local high school. Cole witnesses a game of spin the bottle turn to horror as Bee is revealed to be a psycho killer.  Now Cole must gather his wits and escape his assailants finally proving that he is more than just a kid. My expression once the credits rolled.   If the synopsis of the movie sounds stupid and cheesy, it is because it is stupid and cheesy, albeit purposefully stupid and cheesy, at least I think so.  Although I think the plot is not to be taken seriously, the movie doesn’t make it outright clear that it is operating under a different set of guidelines. I watched it as a movie with a wacky plot, but even wacky needs some ground rules, the movie meanders from coming of age, to horror, to screwball comedy, I half expected the entire thing to a be dream sequence, that is how nonsensical the plot and story became.  But alas, it wasn’t a dream, it was a just shoddy script that tries to pass off all of its plot holes as jokes because the movie is so tongue and cheek (sarcasm). This is the kind of movie a super fan would defend by saying, “You just don’t get the Director.”  Which is true, I don’t get it, and I don’t want to get it, what I want is the hour…

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